Djakarta Warehouse Project Is Where Dance Music Aficionados Go to Party in Asia

Published: November 3, 2016

Djakarta (Jakarta) is the megalopolis capital of Indonesia, making it the perfect home for the 13th annual Djakarta Warehouse Project, which is far and away the most successful EDM event in Southeast Asia. That's why we named it one of Asia's best music festivals.

In just one month, the eighth edition of the Indonesian flagship festival will touch down at the colossal Jiexpo Kemayoran Convention Center on December 9th and 10th. Added to the list of already confirmed acts (Martin Garrix, Carl Cox, Hardwell, Zedd, and more) is HARD head honcho Destructo and platinum award winning deep house producer Duke Dumont. Tech house prodigy Hot Since 82, veteran French-Canadian producer Tiga, and L.A. based DJ sensation Tokimonsta will also join the already stacked lineup to showcase their selection of deeper cuts, while heavy-hitters Valentino Khan, Jason Ross and Ummet Ozcan bring their dynamic performances to over 80,000 revelers from across the world.

And DWP always does a great job repping its hometown talent. This year, 30 regional support acts have been confirmed to join the heavyweights across three spectacular stages, which includes the DWP return of the beloved Life in Color, "the world’s largest paint party," with their massive KINGDOM concept, which promises to take fans "on a journey like never before." Sign us up.

Enjoy the DWP's official 2016 playlist below. Trust us, it's addictive.

Djakarta Warehouse Project is a nominee in our Best Fest Quest 2017, in which festivals are in the running to score a position on our list of the 300 world's best festivals. Vote here.

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